Wednesday, 15 February 2012

Insults fly as Greeks turn to anti-austerity parties



It’s pretty clear now, isn't it, what Germany and the other Axis powers are up to. They’re trying to force Greece out of the euro. No promises Greek politicians make, no amount of self-defeating measures they adopt, will be enough. The Axis has decided that Greece is not worth salvation and that to protect their own interests, it has to be cut adrift. So much for European solidarity, so much for European union. That myth – which Greeks have clung to more determinedly than any other country in Europe – has disintegrated.

But even if it is the intention of the Axis powers – Germany, Holland, Finland and Luxembourg – to make life so impossible for Greece that Greece decides by itself that it jacks in the euro; then Greece mustn’t fall into this trap. Why give the Germans and the Finns what they want? Wouldn't it be harder for them – and easier for Greece – if Greece says: ‘We're defaulting; but we’re keeping the euro.’

Anyway, above is President Karolos Papoulias’ outburst today after German finance minister Wolfgang Schauble said Germany was no longer prepared to ‘pour money into a bottomless pit’, and Luxembourg Prime Minister Jean-Claude Juncker, head of the group of eurozone finance ministers, said Greece would need increased supervision to ensure it implements the austerity programme.

Papoulias said: ‘I can't accept Mr Schauble taunting my country. I can't accept this – as a Greek. Who is Mr Schauble… to taunt Greece? Who are the Dutch? Who are the Finns? We always had the pride to defend not only our freedom, not only our country, but the freedom of Europe.’

And what of the humiliating pledge the Axis are making Papandreou/Venizelos and Samaras sign that they will retain the austerity measures after the April elections? Well, it seems to me as if it’s being made on the false assumption that Samaras, in particular, will emerge as the new prime minister. In fact, the latest opinion poll suggests New Democracy’s fortunes are flagging and Samaras’ position may deteriorate even further if the general election turns into a referendum on the austerity programme. Thus, the current standing of the parties is as follows: New Democracy 27.5 percent; the Democratic Left 16 percent; the Communist Party of Greece (KKE) 14 percent; Coaltion of the Radical Left (SYRIZA) 13.5 percent; PASOK 12 percent; LAOS 4.5 percent; Greens 3 percent; Golden Dawn 2.5 percent.

If these numbers were reflected in the actual election, then Samaras would not be prime minister – or would be PM of a weak, minority government – while those opposed to the troika measures would be considerably strengthened in parliament.


11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Its not a matter of "giving them what they want" its a matter of honour. They want us out of the euro and the union and they want to humiliate us into leaving. Enough! We are not beggars. Greece has a very hard road ahead and it will not get much help from our European "brothers". Better we set off on that road on our own than to be pushed on it kicking and screaming.

Hermes said...

Personally, I would advocate a military coup if the loony tunes extreme Left parties come anywhere near power. Perhaps, Papoulias's words in front of the generals was symbolic i.e. the generals are saying through the decaying Papoulias, "Don't f**ck with us or we will take matter into our own hands". Or, at least I hope so.

In fact, Greece should have a National Security Council of some sort comprising of the most trusted institutions of the country, armed forces, the Academy, the Church. If the parliament is asked to decide on an existential matter of national importance, then they have veto power. The Greeks have lost all trust in the parliament anyway. We could learn something from Iran in this respect.

Anonymous said...

Do not blame the Axis, the Merkels, German or else. They have to do what is right in the interests of the EU. Our political class is entirely responsible for having led us to this cul-de sac. The Brussles mafia was of course their best accomplices. The party is ove now. We should not have gone inside the Euro in the first place. If we fail to acknowledge this primordial and fundamental faux pas, we have learnt nothing from the experience, nightmare. Now the only reasonable and sensible thing to do is to ran out from the houe of madmen, the EU. Greece is not for the EU and neither is the EU for Greece. This body of walking corpses will disintegrate in any case. Why pretend hypocritically to belong when we don't belong. We have no guardians of the nation to intervene and get the chesnuts out of the fire anymore. The military, the backbone of the nation's sovereignty has been neutered by the parasitic parliamentarians. This political class will destroy us as a nation, as a people. Our land is no longer the homeland of Hellenes, but a sanctuary and dumping ground , not only of the EU toxic debt, but also of the millions of illegals human traffic in conformity with preposterous, absurd and masochistic immigration policies of the EU .

Anonymous said...

Does anybody here things about how Greece got into the actuall situation? Corruption all around, first seen at the political class and today, after seeing the desaster everybody is blaming the Germans, the EU or others. Greece started with a big lie into the Euro, and all what we have today is our own fault and it´s not serious to blame others.

John Akritas said...

There's got to be a middle way between an Iranian-style revolution and a peasant uprising! Actually, H. if Greece were to have a year or so of Papariga or Tsipras, they might get Marxism out of their system. Also, the poll figures are somewhat misleading since, of course, the left hates each other more than it hates the right, so some of government with Papariga as PM and Tsipras as finance minister, while it might provide some amusement, is not likely to happen.

Too many anonymouses. I'm thinking of deleting comments from people too lazy to come up with pseudonyms; but on the first A's point about 'honour': while Greece has to be careful not to cut off its nose to spite its face, there is now a question of national self-respect and the need to make a grand gesture. Maybe making that grand gesture of defiance will be what Greece needs to bring it out of the despair of austerity. A 'no' to the troika and the bankers would be some sort of catharsis.

Anonymous said...

I must say I don't get the point. If Mr Papoulias thinks we Finns, Germans and Dutchs are taunting Greece why just not to accept 130 billion euros bailout and let it go. Or maybe Mr. Papoulias thinks Greece really needs the money but no compensation is needed. We haven't caused your problems, your politicians have. Mr. Papoulias has been long time in politics but now he blaming others. That's what the politicians always do. I think he should look at the mirror.

- A Finn -

John Akritas said...

I think his point was: who the hell are a bunch of uncivilised drunken nobodies like the Finns and the Dutch who've contributed nothing to human culture – particularly the Finns – to taunt the Greeks, who are geniuses and freedom fighters. In this respect, he was saying to the Finns, yes, you may produce good mobile phones, but talk to us when you come up with some poets, philosophers and warriors. He was saying, I believe, that the Finns have the highest rates of alcoholism, obesity and suicide in Europe and it's absurd for these degenerates to bad-mouth Greeks. This was his point, I believe. Europe is a product of Greek civilisation, he was saying, not Finnish civilisation – not that there is, of course, such a thing as Finnish civilisation.

Anonymous said...

Thank you John for your reply. You might be right. However I still wonder why do you need 130 billion euros financial aid though you have this rich culture of yours ?

And yet talking about history. It's not all about antique heros. You know Greece was ejected from the Latin Monetary Union in 1908, for decreasing the amount of gold in their coins. History seems repeat itself.
- A Finn -

John Akritas said...

I'm sure what Papoulias would say to you is this: in 10 or 20 years time, when Greece's economy has revived, the Finns will still be known for being fat drunks while Greeks will still be known for their civilisation. Or, to put it another way, Greece is Europe, not Finland.

Hermes said...

John, of course, I am joking about Iran. However, a little less parliamentarianism might help.

As for Papoulias, I think what he is saying, that when it came time for the Dutch and Finns to stand up and be counted in WWII they did nothing. The Dutch bent over and let the Germans in and then continued worshipping money and tulips as they always had. And the Finns turned to the Germans for military aid and then invaded the Soviets with them, murdering Jews, Slavs and other minorities along the way. When it came to sacrificing one’s life, the Dutch and Finns were nowhere to be seen. In comparison, Greek history is full of martyrs to freedom, including right up until 1974.

In regards to the supposed bail out money Finland is providing Greece, hopefully the Finns will not come asking for help from Greece when the great Russians rightfully expand their Eurasian Union into Finland.

John Akritas said...

I know you were joking about Iran, and very funny it was too.

An uncle fought in France, Germany and Holland during the Second World War and he said that the Dutch SS were the most fanatical Nazis he came across.