Wednesday, 15 June 2011

Papandreou on the brink…

I’ve been watching the latest developments in Greece here, on Skai TV; and as of four in the afternoon UK time, it seems George Papandreou has offered to step down as prime minister in order to allow the formation of a government of national unity admitting, essentially, that he is no longer capable of governing the country. Apparently, this offer was made to leader of the opposition, Antonis Samaras, who has said, according to Skai, that his conditions for supporting a national unity government are: a renegotiation of the troika economic ‘rescue’ package; constitutional reform; and changes in the country’s immigration policy. 

A note on the ‘indignants’: they are reclaiming Syntagma Square from rioters, dancing pentozali and chanting, according to this report, Hellas, Hellas, Hellas. 



UPDATE: rather than resigning, Papandreou has now declared his intention to carry on as prime minister, form a new government and seek endorsement for it from Parliament, effectively daring his own MPs to bring down the government. This doesn’t seem tenable. Papandreou’s time is done. He’s lost authority. He hasn't persuaded Greeks that they should suffer another wave of cuts and austerity measures.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

When he says changes to immigration policy I hope he means undoing what the traitor Papandreou has done. Global depresssion doesn't scare me as much as thinking that all the pakistanis and africans in Greece will become citizens.

ted

Hermes said...

Hopefully, the whole world will finally realise just what sort of a goofball Papandreou really is. He has completely run out of options. However, the Greek people and PASOK must take the blame for this - PASOK selected this dimwit as their PM candidate and then the Greek people voted him in. Of course, the Greek people are less to blame because they hardly had a choice after the ND fiasco. Given all this, I am not totally convinced of Samaras. Its easy to say let's renegotiate the memorandum in opposition but he may have acted very differently in power.

John Akritas said...

For a start, there was no need for P. to enter a coalition govt. Pasok has a healthy majority in parliament and the govt should have been able to push through its legislative programme. If he can't command his own party, then it's a fatal admission of weakness if he then seeks support among the opposition. Secondly, national unity govts are overrated. It's normal for parties and so on to disagree. Thirdly, by looking for a consensus among politicians to push through the latest measures, P. doesn't seem to have realised that Greeks are no longer convinced by cuts and austerity. He had their agreement for the first wave, but has since lost legitimacy because they didn't work or weren't accompanied by wider reforms and so on. Would the indignants have packed up if ND and Pasok had formed a national unity govt? I doubt it. Perhaps this stitch up would have made things worse. The indignants smell blood now and P. won't survive.

Hermes said...

Papandreou only wanted to enter a coalition government in order to spread the responsibility of the decisions his government can make on their own. Samaras is too clever for this sort of tactic. He rightly rejected Papandreou's overtures. As you say, he lacks the support of his own party now; therefore, he is finished. What's next? Venizelos or Loverdos? Or, perhaps, someone entirely different. And looking further ahead, if Greece does go to a general election and Samaras wins, will Europe deal with him. Apparently, his credibility is shot.

Perhaps bring the tanks onto the street and establish an enlightened Bonapartist-type oligarchy for ten years which focuses on rebuilding Greece's productive base, removes immigrants etc.

gineen said...

sadly i fear the new PM will be the IMF. The European Central Bank will vote him in.
But I agree he is finished

Hermes said...

The Russian intelligence report on the planned assasination of Karamanlis is interesting. Perhaps its true but release it now? Or, perhaps its a creation of the FSB or KYP for whatever reason?

lastgreek said...

The Russian intelligence report on the planned assasination of Karamanlis is interesting.

What would be the point of assassinating Karamanli? The guy's been brain dead for years.

Speaking of brain dead dummies, can you imagine the uproar by the banksters if the G-Pap had selected Donald Trump as his new finance minister?

The banksters know Greece is finished. All this tough talk of new loans is just a charade to steal Greece's public assets. This will be achieved if the Greeks are stupid enough to agree to collateralized loans.

Hermes said...

LG, the report was about incidents in 2008 when Karamanlis was still in power. Some people believe that Karamanlis was not very well liked in Washington because he opened diplomatic discussions regarding energy, defense etc with the Russians, said no to Skopje in Europe and reactivated the S-300 defense system in Crete.

lastgreek said...

Ask yourselves, "Who is being bailed out, Greece or the European banks?"

lastgreek said...

Greece's witching hour: 21:00 GMT (or 17:00 Eastern Daylight Time)

Anonymous said...

"Who is being bailed out, Greece or the European banks?"

Banks, mostly. With (northern& central) european taxpayers money...

Kippis