Sunday, 3 April 2011

O Drakos (The Dragon): with English subtitles



Certain readers have been complaining that there's too much politics and not enough film on this blog; so to appease them I’ve managed to upload O Drakos (The Dragon); a strange, surreal Greek film from 1956, which is part film noir, part Kafka, part Ionescu, part Ealing Comedy, part Gogol. The film, which I’ve attached English subtitles to, is directed by Nikos Kountouros, was written by Iakovos Kambanellis, stars Dinos Iliopoulos and has a great soundtrack by Manos Hadjidakis. The Greek Film Critics Association once voted O Drakos the best Greek film of all time.

5 comments:

lastgreek said...

Certain readers have been complaining that there's too much politics and not enough film on this blog ...

Hey, I like films too. One favourite that I have is a Spanish film noir: Amantes (Lovers), 1991. It's directed by Vicente Aranda. The sizzzzzzzzzzzzzzzling love scene between Luisa (Victoria Abril) and Paco (Jorge Sanz), who is a much younger and is engaged to be married to another woman, is reason alone to watch this film. I am, of course. talking about the imfamous, out-of-this-world, erotic "handkerchief scene". Yeah ... that scene ... wow ... wow again ....

I was going to mention another film, but I've completely lost my train of thought here. Maybe later :-)

Anonymous said...

Thanks for posting the movie, John.

I actually went to Vidiots (an independent video store) last week and asked if they had this film. They didn't. They have a very robust and extensive international selection so, it was a bit of a disappointment. I'm glad to see that you provided. I am a movie buff as well.

-HCG

John Akritas said...

HCG: those good people at youtube have recently enabled my account there to allow me to upload videos longer than the usual 15 minutes, which means I can post full-length films, which I'm doing until copyright issues intervene.

John Akritas said...

Also, I haven't seen the documentaries you mention to LG; but on the same subject I did see recently Tommy Lee Jones in The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, which I thought was an unbelievably good film – a lot like Peckinpah, who I like a lot.

Anonymous said...

John, I appreciate you taking the time to upload them.

The two documentaries I suggested are pretty grim and realistic. I'm not sure if that's because the subject matter discussed can be resolved (if more people were informed) or if it's because most people are happy with remaining uninformed and don't care to improve things--so no positive solutions are currently offered.

Even though it's good to stay informed--I also enjoy movies done by talented, creative people which have nothing to do with the current worldwide turmoil:) Nice escapism.
-HCG