Sunday, 31 October 2010

Return the Parthenon marbles to Greece so that Greek workers can protest against them



Thanks to the Cyprus Action Network of America for drawing attention to a recent protest at the British Museum by the Cypriot student organisation Metopo (see video above), part of the Bring Them Back campaign, which demands the repatriation of the Parthenon Marbles from London to Athens, to the new Acropolis museum.

While it’s laudable that Metopo should make the effort for this cause, personally I’ve never been able to get overly-excited by the demand for the repatriation of the marbles. What do Greeks think? That once the marbles return, Greece will be redeemed and a new Periclean age will be initiated? The whole marbles obsession – just like the Greek mania for staging the Olympics in 2004 – is a distraction. Greece needs a vibrant and creative society worthy of the marbles – capable, actually, of producing new Phidias’ – not just fancy, well-stocked museums, testament to the vanity of politicians, whose ambitions for Greeks is limited to turning them into a nation of museum curators and spectators of the past.

Moreover, while it’s undeniable that that the British are barbarians and London is a Third World Afro-Islamic city, so are the Greeks and so is Athens. And if you think it’s an exaggeration to call the Greeks barbarians, then how would you describe the behaviour of the culture ministry contract workers (see video below) who, on the national holiday of 28 October, climbed on top of the gateway (Propylaia) to the Acropolis to protest being laid off, and the justification for their actions given by their union rep Nikos Hasomeris that: 

‘The marbles on their own aren’t anything. Somebody has to put them on show. Working with these marbles are guards, cleaners and archaeologists and it is they who make it possible for all these people who spend thousands of euros to come to see this monument. Without these people [the workers], this monument can’t function.’

It should be added that, as far as I’m aware, not only were the protesters on the Propylaia not shot down, they were not even arrested or charged, i.e. there were no consequences for their actions.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why would they be arrested ? That would be a facisitc act. These protesters are left wing trostkytes, descendants of Elphiades; in full cahoots with the organs of the decrepit and fossilized government apparatus. If the protesters were true nationalists, true Greeks, they would not have been able, nor allowed to get off from the transport vehicles at the Acropolis station; let alone, climb and position themselves up the hill. We have to recognize that we have an untinational, a marxist-trotskyte international cabala ruling Greece. The political parties are all the one and the same, different faces on a single coin. There is no hope for Greece.The borders are open, we have an afro-asian invasion in full swing and in crescendo. Greek nationals cower before the presence of Afganie-Pakistanies-Bamngladeshis mangy rodents, not to mention the simian from Africa and the lugubrious muslims from the arabian and north african deserts. The economy is not our main problem; the crisis is a sideshow; the fatal onslaught is the unrrelenting invasion and there is nothing but silences from the so called " leadership-elite class". Crisis ?; what crisis ?; we are reeling under an undeclared war of invasion of our homeland. ile

Hermes said...

I detest Papandreou too. I believe he is the most dangerous man to be involved in Greek politics since probably Alcibiades. He is dangerous because for many people he seems to be friendly and polite.


Regardless, his brother (who I do not like much either) has written some interesting articles on Greece in English (for those Greeks with poor Greek reading skills). Here is a good one on modern Greek music:

http://www.npapandreou.gr/en/?cat=31

Hermes said...

Look at these dopes! This is what our race has devolved too...

http://www.astynomia.gr/index.php?option=ozo_content&perform=view&id=4613&Itemid=528&lang

lastgreek said...

H,

I had a good look at "these dopes." Yes, I know--it doesn't auger well for the Greek nation. But if I may attempt the impossible and put a postive spin on this, at least "these dopes" looked like Greeks. I dare say that in a generation or two, we won't be able to distinguish a Greek from an African or Asian.