Friday, 24 September 2010

Bulgarian PM gives thumbs down to Neo-Ottomanism

Interesting article here from the Sofia News Agency regarding how, during a Turkish-hosted dinner for Balkan leaders in New York, Bulgarian PM Boyko Borisov snubbed Turkish president Abdullah Gul’s efforts to present his country as unrivalled hegemon in the region and himself as sultan of a re-emerging Ottoman empire. The article says that Borisov was ‘the only one of the leaders who did not rise to welcome the president of Turkey’, which means that Greece’s FM Dimitris Droutsas, who was also at the event, did tug his forelock, though, at least, he didn’t go as far as Fyrom President George Ivanov and Albanian PM Sali Berisha who both, apparently, ‘rushed to hug’ their  master as he arrived at the dinner.

6 comments:

Hermes said...

The article linked below helps to clarify some of the ideoloigical fogginess that pervades modern Greek and Diasporic society about the Asia Minor campaign. It is this ideological fogginess which has contributed to some of the Neo-Ottoman tendencies amongst the Greek elite.

http://www.diplomatikoperiskopio.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=622:2010-09-25-07-12-27&catid=53:2008-06-14-16-50-37&Itemid=82

Hermes said...

The below article, by a respected international relations expert, shows why Greece and Greeks should be careful not to support too strongly any attack on Iran, as Iran is a good balancer against a strong Turkey.

http://infognomonpolitics.blogspot.com/2010/09/blog-post_489.html

John Akritas said...

Although the bloke below reckons that Turkey-Iran relations are set to deepen; not that this precludes Greece getting in there with the Iranians, but what have we got to offer them and what can we gain from them? It used to be the case, in the 1980s and 1990s, that Iran could rely on Greece to support it in the EU – I remember Greece was the only country that voted against banning the import into the EU of cancer-causing Iranian pistachio nuts and Vasso Papandreou, wearing a mantilla, visiting the ayatollahs on a trade mission – but the Iranians have got more extreme and Greece no longer has an independent voice, in the EU or anywhere else.

Besides, if the future is going to see the Iranians and Turks cosying up, then this probably means the other side will consist of the Russians and the Arabs; the Russians and Arabs are probably a better bet for Greece – although we have some issues with the Arabs (and Iranians) in the Balkans and all this presupposes a dynamic and smart Greek foreign policy, which as the article you link to makes clear, is a forlorn hope and has been for years. In general, Greece's instincts are for deeper American ties and closer identification with EU (at least, the Franco-German wing of it) foreign policy, another reason why the Israel option must seem so attractive to Papandreou.

http://www.neurope.eu/articles/Which-way-is-Turkey-going/102829.php

Hermes said...

Iranian and Turkish relations will probably only deepen at a tactical level in dealing with the Kurdish problem. However, Iran will never accept Turkey's new found enthusiasm for reconstructing the Caliphate as they are not Sunni and their courting of the Azerbaijanis and Turkey will not be pleased by Iran's courting of the Alevis. There could be some symbisios in energy production and transportation but probably little else over the long term.

I do not believe the Iranians have become more extreme. If anything, it is the Turks who have made the most significant changes.

Greece does have something to give Iran. They can provide an avenue for approaching the EU or members of the EU. Admittedly, it is not much.

Hermes said...

Important message: Neo-Ottomanism reaches Australia!!!

http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/world/turkey-threatens-to-delay-gallipoli-survey-in-statue-row/story-e6frfkui-1225931906298

lastgreek said...

Regarding Iran and its relations with other countries, one question that I have is ... Who the hell is in charge there? The Revolutionary Guards? Ahmadinejad? The Moullahs? I don't think they themselves know.