Friday, 19 September 2008

Surprise, surprise

Surprise, surprise. A constant companion of Gay MacDougall's, the so-called UN human rights expert, on her recent trip to Greece in search of 'Turk' and 'Macedonian' minorities was Panayiotis Dimitras, the self-appointed president of Greek Helsinki Monitor; the self-declared anarchist – 'Proudhon version'; self-publicist, darling of Fyromian nationalists, who cannot resist any opportunity to give interviews to the Fyromian press denouncing Greece and providing succour to Fyromian nationalism and its absurd discourse against Greece; whose whole life is dedicated to attacking the Greek state, claiming it is 'authoritarian' to uphold the law, yet using every opportunity to pursue through the Greek courts – claiming defamation – anyone who criticises his advocacy of the Turkish nationalist position in Thrace or the Fyromian nationalist discourse concerning Macedonia. A sanctimonious hypocrite if ever there was one, a professional malcontent, an intolerant, conceited sociopath – his father Ilias Dimitras was a minister in the government of the Greek junta – and a useful tool of anti-Greek foreign powers, whether he likes it or not.

6 comments:

Ivy said...

I am sure you know about this but some of your readers may want to read more about him.
http://www.geocities.com/anaxfiles/forum/helwatch.html

john akritas said...

The problem with PDimi is that he is so vain and ideologically driven that he cannot countenance the possibility that he is being used by interests whose intentions towards Greece are wholly malicious.

Hermes said...

In a serious country Panayiotis Dimatras would have died from food poisoning years ago.

Hermes said...

http://www.ardin.gr/blog/?p=219

Some thought provoking discussion by Karabelias vis a vis conflict between the Axis of Evil and Russia and how we can benefit.

john akritas said...

It's a very interesting talk Karambelias gives. He identifies well the trends and the choices Greece faces. I'm skeptical, however, about how how our cultural associations with the Chinese and Russians will work to our advantage – geopolitical alliances rarely come about through cultural affiliation and I'm not convinced that our shared Orthodox religion with the Russians counts for much. I'm more convinced by Karambelias when he talks about how useful Greece – and Cyprus – can be to the Chinese and Russians in projecting their political and economic power and being their 'ambassadors' in the EU, and how the decline of American power is good for Greece. What Karambelias makes no mention of, however, is Turkey; no mention of any significant rapprochement between us and them – this attempt at rapprochement has been at the cornerstone of Greek foreign policy for the last 20 years. Apparently, and rightly, Karembelias believes any rapprochement is pie in the sky.

(I also have to say that the host in these Karambelias' talks – the bloke in the mustard-coloured jacket – cracks me up. He's borderline insane).

Hermes said...

I agree that the "cultural association" card is often over-exaggerated. Like Panagiotis Kondylis once said, "if Serbia was 60 million people and sought access to the Aegean, and Turkey was 9 million people, then we'd probably have cooperation with the Turks".

I also agree that Kostas Hountas is extremely funny. One of the best comedians in Greece. You feel like any second he is about to snap - but he never does! However, we are fortunate to have these type of people. Without them we'd quickly regress to that great American shopping mall of idiocy.