Wednesday, 19 December 2007

Radio Akritas: Papaioannou, part two

On Radio Akritas last week, I made available three Papaioannou songs and said the great rembetis was from Asia Minor and that part of his repertoire included several songs in Turkish, which I liked and wanted to share but felt guilty about sharing.

I said to myself that if anybody mentioned anything to me about wanting to hear the Turkish songs, I would put them up; and, indeed, my fellow Cypriot, Ardent, from Australia, didn’t like the reason I gave for not putting the songs up – i.e. guilt about the songs being in Turkish – and effectively challenged me to play the songs. So here they are:

1. Gelmenden, sung by Papaioannou and Rena Ntalia.
2. Rambi-rambi, sung by Rena Ntalia; and
3. Karapiperim, sung mostly in Greek by Eleftheria Arvanitaki; though I do have an even livelier, full-blown Turkish version of this song somewhere.

16 comments:

Ardent said...

John, yesterday I quickly visited your site. I noticed that you posted the Turkish songs by Papaioannou. I quickly listened to Karapiperim. It was great, I absolutely loved it! As I was in a hurry I did not have time to listen to the first two songs. When I got home late yesterday evening, those songs had been removed from the Box. Is there anyway in which you could re-post them? I would like to listen to them, especially also the livelier version of Karapiperim. How can I download these songs?
:)

Ardent said...

Sorry John, I worked it out. I did not scroll down the box. I thought that you deleted them. Sorry. I have downloaded the songs. They are great! If you find the livelier version of Karapiperim, could you also please post it, I would love to listen to it. Thanks!!!
:)

john akritas said...

Hi, Ardent
I'm glad you liked the songs. I've uploaded the other version of Karapiperim in the radio player; it's the fourth song when you scroll down.

Stavros said...

Bravo Ardent and John,

Papaioannou is superb and I'm glad you gave me the chance to hear these songs in Turkish. Turkish never seemed like a strange foreign language to me since its familiar sounds were part of my childhood. My parents always spoke to us in Greek but when they didn't want us kids to know what they were discussing.

This music is part of our Greek cultural legacy and we should not be ashamed of it. Bravo paidia.

Stavros said...

I never finished the sentence. "They spoke Turkish."

john akritas said...

Stavro
I'm glad you liked the songs. Papaioannou has the reputation of being the greatest ever bouzouki player and when you hear his musicianship in Gelmenden and Rambi-rambi, you can understand why.

Hermo, what did you think of the songs?

Stavros said...

John,

I read the exchange on Ardent's site. I commend both of you.

Ardent said...

Stavros, Bravo!
When we were little my parents spoke to us Turkish. But when they wanted private Adult exchange with my Aunties and Uncles, or when my mother was trying to direct my father to observe our bad conduct they always spoke Greek.

How very convenient. :)

Stavros said...

Yes, rather convenient. During my wayward youth I was also familiar with the pandofla (slipper) and koutala (large wooden spoon) and their various uses. My father seldom need such items, however, his presence alone had a calming effect.

Back to Radio Akritas.

Hermes said...

These songs are interesting and enjoyable. I get the same feeling when I hear Algerian or Lebanese music. Which I like. However, the Turkish language is not part of my heritage at all. The Italian language was more familiar to me. The difference between the Italian and Turkish confrontation with Hellenism is that the Italian comes from the same roots as Hellenism. Turkish is too foreign. Asiatic-Mongoloid. What seems like similarities were because Turks came into contact with Mediterrenean culture or because it was forced upon us. There can be no reconciliation until past wrongs are made right. Of course, Greek Americans seeped in liberalism want us to join hands. This is understandable. But this is why they cannot be wholly trusted with leadership positions in the Greek community as evidenced by the loathsome Andrew Athens.

Ardent, you should feel privileged your parents spoke Greek because it gives insight into a wonderful culture. Do not expect this to be reciprocated.

john akritas said...

It’s interesting to think about how little the Turkish language and culture affected Greeks over the centuries, particularly when you consider the longer-lasting cultural impact of French and English imperialism on the peoples they ruled, often for shorter periods. It seems that under the Ottomans, particularly in the first two centuries of occupation, we just withdrew into ourselves.

Hermes said...

Yes, One Worldists and Neo Ottomans like to point out how many Turkish words are in the Greek vernaculer today. They forget to mention how many Persian, Latin or Slavic words as well. The Turks have no privileged position in Hellenism. Actually, the Persian and Latin influence was much more positive. They at least built real civilisations. The Turks took their religion from the Arabs, their literature from the Persians and their culture from the Greeks and Armenians. There is not much there.

ardent said...

Hermes, I had to laugh when I read your comment.
You state, 'you should feel privileged your parents spoke Greek because it gives insight into a wonderful culture. Do not expect this to be reciprocated.'

My parents spoke Greek because they learnt it from their neighbours. Learning any language is a benefit, not a privilage.



Hermes you are a one eyed Nationalist where as I am an Internationalist. It is everyone’s basic human right to proclaim their identity – nationality, race or religion. I am a Muslim Turk and very proud of it but at the same time re-joice in other cultures and nationalities.



(Ardent, control yourself: no personal stuff, please).

Ardent said...

John, Have you been deleting my comments again?

Shame!

Hermes said...

Ardent, if you are an Internationalist how can you also be a Muslim Turk? And who denied your basic human right to proclaim your identity? Are you confused?

Ardent said...

No I am definitely not confused. You see I do not have a problem with other nationalities or religions. I have total respect for other cultures. It is everyone's human right to proclaim their identity but without putting other nationalities or religions down. I do not have a problem with Greeks or the Orthodox religion. I do not have a problem associating with ANY nationality. But some people do!